Visiting landmarks in the northeastern mountains of San Diego

Warner Ranch HouseLast week, I went out on a photo safari to visit a handful of California Historical Landmarks in the northern half of San Diego’s mountainous back country. With my friend Sandy, we visited seven CHLs, as well as a few other sites, some of which were sought after for photos by Wiki Loves Monuments.

Here’s where we visited:

  • No. 533: San Pasqual Battlefield State Historic Park – Outside Escondido is the battlefield where Californios fought against American troops during the Mexican War.
  • San Diego Archaeological Center, where they both curate different archaeological artifacts and also help display them to educate the public.
  • 3 National Register of Historical Landmark buildings in the Ramona area: Mt. Woodson Castle, Ramona Town Hall, and the Verlaque House (now a museum)
  • Santa Ysabel General Store – now restored as a store, and operated by SOHO.
  • No. 412: Julian: After visiting the plaque in front of the Julian Town Hall, we found lunch and pie nearby!
  • No. 369: Site of the Chapel at Santa Ysabel: We visited the new chapel at Santa Ysabel, along with the site of the first chapel, their one-room museum, and their cemetery.
  • No. 311: Warner’s Ranch, south of Warner Springs. The ranch house has been recently renovated by SOHO for visiting, while the barn is still needing restoration.
  • No. 482: Camp Wright, in Oak Grove. Camp Wright was a Union camp set up to protect the stagecoach route (and thus communications between California and the rest of the country) during the Civil War.
  • No. 502: Oak Grove Stage Station.  One of the few remaining stations of the Butterfield Overland Mail route. Only 500 feet north of the Camp Wright site.
  • No. 243: Asistencia San Antonio de Pala. This mission stills serves the native peoples of the Pala reservation. Interestingly enough, the plaque is located several blocks away from the church, back on the main highway.

I’ll get some pictures posted soon!

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